Static or noise coming through speakers ? HELP!

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DJbobbi

New Member
Hi guys,



I have a Ev zx1 and when I play music at loud volumes it sounds like a hissing sound is coming from the speakers. I am playing music through my laptop to my Denon DNX500 mixer and then from there to the DBX EQ and then from there to my Crossover and then to my amps and then speakers. Also there is some hissing sound when I push a fader all the way up and there is no music coming through or anything, is that normal ?



Does anyone have any idea what could be causing this ? Any suggestions are very much appreciated. Thank you so much!
 

DJSTEVEZ

DJ Emeritus
Hi guys, I have a Ev zx1 and when I play music at loud volumes it sounds like a hissing sound is coming from the speakers. I am playing music through my laptop to my Denon DNX500 mixer and then from there to the DBX EQ and then from there to my Crossover and then to my amps and then speakers. Also there is some hissing sound when I push a fader all the way up and there is no music coming through or anything, is that normal ?

Does anyone have any idea what could be causing this ? Any suggestions are very much appreciated. Thank you so much!
A few questions...

  • Where is your cell phone placed during all of this?
  • Is the "balanced" path broken at any point in the signal chain?
  • I'm assuming you're using a soundcard of some type?

-Z-
 

Froggy Music Dj

New Member
I have had this issue a few times and I have found that it is actually the power cord to the laptop. If you buy a conditioner/filter for your left and right aux to your mixer, it should fix the problem. You can get one for 15 bucks or so and it does wonders. Something cheap to try and it fixed the issue I had.
 

DJSTEVEZ

DJ Emeritus
I have had this issue a few times and I have found that it is actually the power cord to the laptop. If you buy a conditioner/filter for your left and right aux to your mixer, it should fix the problem. You can get one for 15 bucks or so and it does wonders. Something cheap to try and it fixed the issue I had.
Good call. To diagnosis this, try your set up without your lappy operating on a/c...remove the power cord from both the lappy & the a/c plug. If this (temporarily) solves your problem...here's the long term solution >>>

Bill from ESC sells them for a really good price and his customer services is an experience no one should die without having had at least once.

 

dboomer

Member
Also there is some hissing sound when I push a fader all the way up and there is no music coming through or anything, is that normal ?

!
I can be. Has your gain structure been calibrated? Does the noise go away if you unplug your laptop?

Also if the laptop power supply is the culprit, simple test ... try it on the battery supply.
 

bill_smith

MobileBeat Moderator
Staff member
Reduce volume to to mixer to about 3/4, or less, and see if it goes away. If you've also got the mixer gain at the stops, you could be indcuing somethign as well. Set the master gain to unity( zero db) or slightly below, and see if these improve the hiss. If not, agree with Bob.
 

DJbobbi

New Member
Hey guys, It looks like it's back. I know for a fact it's not the computer because when I unplug my computer and the audio source from my computer I still have the hissing coming from the speakers.

Bill, when your talking about mixer gain stops, what do you mean ?

Thanks alot everyone
 

bill_smith

MobileBeat Moderator
Staff member
The volume control for the master outputs on the mixer. What kind of mixer are you using?
 

dboomer

Member
Gain Structure

Assuming you don't have a bad cable of hardware issues with a piece of gear ... turn your mixer UP and your power amps DOWN. You will still have the exact same amount of total power but will have lower overall hiss.

What are the exact model numbers of the gear in your audio chain? How are they connected (balanced cables, unbalanced or a combination) from unit to unit?
 

djtunes

Checking Reality
Unless you're using a $1000 + mixer and comparable costing amplifier, EQ etc. you are gonna get some hiss out of the speakers at high volume when no music is being played. To sound like a million bucks you have to spend $$$.

I'm assuming the hiss is only noticeable when the music is not playing.

I have a QSC RMX amp that has less hiss at high gain than my QSC GX series amp. So like someone else said... turn down the gain on your amp. Make sure your gains on your EQ are not too high also. If there are any signal wires or speaker wires laying close to (parallel of) power cords it's not good.

Keep all of your eq settings flat (right in the middle) and adjust things down (attenuate) to make improvements in the sound whenever possible. When you boost any eq settiing you're also boosting some distortion and probably adding hiss. If you want more sizzle and bass, turn down the mid levels instead of boosting the extreme lows and highs too much. Are you using the Zx1s stand alone or with a sub or two? I found that stand alone the ZX1 passives need a lot of bass boost to get the sound I want from them.

Search this forum for some of the most recent threads discussing gain structure. It will be a useful learning experience... for free.

What amp? An inexpensive amp is gonna have some noise (hiss). Or are you using the powered ZX1s?

Keep power cords, signal cords, and speaker cables apart as much as possible, and don't let different types of power, or signal cords lay along (parallel of) each other.

Good luck.
 
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dboomer

Member
Unless you're using a $1000 + mixer and comparable costing amplifier, EQ etc. you are gonna get some hiss out of the speakers at high volume when no music is being played. To sound like a million bucks you have to spend $$$.
ALL systems have noise. It's called the "noise floor", a system's lower limit. What is relevant is how much louder than the hiss a system can get. How loud you can turn up something before it distorts (or otherwise becomes unusable is the upper limit (ceiling). Generally turning down things increases the apparent noise because you are operating closer to the floor than to the ceiling.

So if you turn your mixer down you are operating it closer to the noise floor. Then if you turn the sensitivity all the way up on your amps you are adding extra amplification to that noise. Now if you turn your mixer up, you are ioperating if further above the noise floor (but don't go so far up as to get into distortion). Now if you turn your amp down (by the same number of dB) your even less hissy mixer isn't being amplified as much so your overall noise hiss is less by that same number of dB.

Most systems I see are giving away the dynamic range you paid for by not understanding how gain structure works. Of course if you are happy with the way your system performs then you don't need to worry about it ... even if improvement is possible.
 

DJbobbi

New Member
Okay guys I think all of your answers pretty much summed up the problems I've been having. Maybe it's just my sensitive ears that are really picky about that sort of thing.

I now have a new problem. I've been running my Zx1's with a NL2 to 1/4 adapter because I have all these 1/4 cables lying around that aren't doing anything so I figured I'd buy two adapters and just run them with the 1/4 cable. Well, I decided that I want to run them with strictly speakon cables and I just had the cables arrive today. When I plug them in they don't work at all!

I know the Zx1's call for a NL4 connector but I've been running them for weeks with a NL2 adapter. Just for the sake of it I opened one of the cables up and only found two wires running through the jacket. Is that suppose to be like that? If it is, then how come my NL2 adapter works find but these NL2 speakon cables that I bought don't work?


Thanks a lot guys for all your help. It's very much appreciated.
 
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