Seismic Audio Speakers

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franknichols

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I have a question. The sound man in the band I play bass with was telling me about these speakers from Seismic Audio. He asked my thoughts and since I have never head of them, I thought I would put the question out there.

Are they good, bad or just plain ol' firewood material?

Thanks for any help.

Frank:cool:
 
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DJGforce

Guest
Judging by their ebay pricing, they are fire fodder, but you never know. I dont want to bash a company before handling the merch. They are cheap enough to place an order to find out without breaking the bank.
However, whoever wrote the product descriptions desn't seem to understand RMS, Cont. and Peak.
 

Ken Heath

Super Moderator...da-ta-daaa!!!
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I cannot tell how they perform from a website, but they look decent enough and their helpful articles seem to be well-written to gently educate the novice without alienating them with big indecipherable words and insider jargon.

I'll have to make a note to look for them at NAMM'11 in January so I can hear them play.
 

franknichols

New Member
Thanks guys.....I am just wondering why such a low price point, and a speaker company that doesn't know RMS/PGM/PEAK distinctions kind of scares me. I called this morning and spoke to someone who told me the RMS and Program ratings were the same thing. He is in their tech dept. Any thoughts??

Frank:cool:
 

Ken Heath

Super Moderator...da-ta-daaa!!!
Staff member
RMS = Root Mean Square; a mathematical formula for a statistical measure of the magnitude of a varying quantity...a sound signal is not a constant level at all frequencies, so an average is complicated.

Program = normal playing of music

Peak = the maximum signal level before damaging components might occur

There is no industry standard of which words mean what, manufacturers can make up any jargon they wish..."program", "RMS", "Average", etc, usually all mean the same thing...average playback levels.

Add to this the fact that many manufacturers want to claim as high a level of performance as possible, (and certainly more than their competition), they will many times 'round up' on their specs to look as good or better...I know of a 700 watt amplifier on the market right now that is advertised as 1000 watts because at a very narrow selected bandwidth with extraordinarily high input voltage you can register 1000w output... I call this 1000 watts ILS (If Lightning Strikes)!

:D
 
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DJGforce

Guest
Typicallt Program ratings are double the rms ratings and peak usually is double the program rating so a 250 rms speaker is 500 program and 1000 peak. Not all are like that, there is some variance there, but typically with brands like Peavey, JBL and Yamaha, thats what you will see. So based on their numbers it seems they have confused rms with program which is not unusual. You'll want to cut their rms numbers in half.
 

Bob Dietrich

Active Member
Unless you play test tones, RMS is of little actual use...HOWEVER...program material is used frequently today and one must use a little common sense here... Older music has far more dynamic range than todays highly compressed pop which can in some cases only have a few dB of actual dynamic range, so in this case, with a highly compressed signal with everything at almost the same level, the RMS rating should be closer to reality than the program rating.

I pay little attention to these numbers really...I've powered a set of inexpensive set of 2 way 15" speakers rated at 175wpc with a 1165wpc (RMS) amp (Crown MA-3600) at quite punishing levels for quite some time in an experiment...commono sense rules the day...although some good info for these speakers SHOULD be available in order to use this common sense...if something is cheap, chances are it will have lower limitations than than a higher quality unit...umm...common sense... ;)
 

bjojade

New Member
Based on the price point, they are likely firewood material. Looking at the photographs of the speakers makes them out to be on the low end of quality as well.

In audio gear, you generally get what you pay for. A dual 15 cabinet for $300 isn't going to be the greatest sounding box in the world. If it is, the other companies have a big problem on their hands....
 

Ken Heath

Super Moderator...da-ta-daaa!!!
Staff member
I suppose your intended use of them is a deciding factor also...I sometimes play on harbor cruises; if I was going to carry speakers on and off ships alot...narrow gangways, no rails on docks, hand-to-hand across watery gaps, etc., I'd rather risk less expensive equipment that will still perform to the parameters of the event.

There are companies who have been in business for decades who provide entry-level equipment that many of us started with...it does have a place in the market, and you cannot know by looking if it's going to sound good enough for your uses.

You can read all you want, look up all the info there is, and your eyes still cannot take the place of your ears!
 

franknichols

New Member
Thanks everyone for your advice. Ken, I agree about your ears being the best judge.

I will pass this info. along to him and see what decision he makes. Thanks again to all.

Frank :cool:
 
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