New Product Review - Bose L1 B"2" Bass Bin

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adjtogo

Well-Known Member
As I stated earlier when I talked to a rep at Bose and ordered mine, is that one B2 is equivalent to four B1's. You can only use two B1 Bass Bins on each L1. So, if you bought two B2's, and used one on each of your L1's, it would be like having eight B1's altogether. Does that make sense to you now?
 

djtunes

Checking Reality
As I stated earlier when I talked to a rep at Bose and ordered mine, is that one B2 is equivalent to four B1's. You can only use two B1 Bass Bins on each L1. So, if you bought two B2's, and used one on each of your L1's, it would be like having eight B1's altogether. Does that make sense to you now?
I bet that would be sweet.
 

robertbenda

Active Member
Indeed. I think I might finally be ready to think about considering making the change. I've always resisted because I still do dances for two schools, but that may change after this year.

As a wedding guy, who already doesn't setup an 18", who does receptions up to 300 often, in some painfully wide or large rooms, what Bose setup should I consider?
 

djlouie atlanta

New Member
Indeed. I think I might finally be ready to think about considering making the change. I've always resisted because I still do dances for two schools, but that may change after this year.

As a wedding guy, who already doesn't setup an 18", who does receptions up to 300 often, in some painfully wide or large rooms, what Bose setup should I consider?

A pair of Bose L1 Model II with 2 B2 Bass Bins. You will love it! (well for now with 4 B1s as I am waiting on Caps review to see if I will buy 2 B2s and sell my 4 B1s)
 

Cap

Always At Your Service
Good news and bad news.

Our test was cut short last night so there wasn't as thorough a testing as any of us wanted (that's the bad news)

The good news is that the B2 in the ( normal ) position when connected to an L1 Classic and the L1 Model 1 (both have been discontinued) brought those entire systems into new life. Then, when we changed the preset from 00 to 57, the results were astounding (meaning good astounding). Then for giggles, we locked in preset 58. Bass was thunderous, but at a very high volume level got borderline muddy.

The ( + ) setting on the B2 had no effect on the L1 Model 1 but dramatically improved the volume and thump on the L1 Model 2. As the new L1 Model M1S uses two B1 or 1 B2 (thus reasonable to assume the same bass amp is in that powerstand too), expect the same results on that new produce when using a B2.

Other than portability (28lbs each B1 versus 45lbs on the B2) and considering two B1s cost $598 versus one B2 at $499 , the B1 is gonna fade away like an old soldier.

Two friends are taking them out this weekend and will be giving me their impressions and a report which will be shared.
 
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Bob Dietrich

Active Member
Small diameter speakers can indeed go very low. But there is a trade off at work here.

10" drivers can easily go as low as 18" drivers ... but (generally speaking) they will either not be as loud or they will require much larger amplifiers (and driver power handling) to do it. There's no free lunch.

I also prefer the sound of smaller woofers as compared to larger woofers. Here again, generally speaking, because the weight of the cone is less the speaker can start and stop faster than a driver with a larger, heavier cone. So smaller drivers generally don't suffer from hangover. When you play a "click" into them you hear a "click" and not a "bong".
Though we generally agree on most things, I have to call foul here. The size of the driver really has little to do with it...the size of the motor structure is what determines how "fast" a sub is of any size. To be fair, many people believe as you do, however most respected speaker designers I know all agree that motor structure means a 18" sub can be just as "fast" as a 10"...simple physics. Given the same size motor, the 10" will be faster to be sure. Given the proper size motor a 15, 18 or larger can be just as fast or faster if you you will.

Lets remember, a speakers job is simply modulation over time...nothing more...motor structure & design dictates the ability to start and stop.
 

dboomer

Member
Maybe a little explanation is in order. The "come to a stop" part is a bigger concern. Since speaker cones behave like a giant spring, the one with the most mass (considering equal surround treatments) will take longer to coast to a stop.

As far as motor size ... well the result is motor size times the mass it has to lift. There is a limit. Probably most don't know it, it is not difficult to have a speaker motor system (magnet) that is too big and actually starts working backwards. Simply the magnet can become too strong and actually begin to "stop" the speaker from moving at the same time it is working to move it. This usually begins to happen a little over 14000 gauss in the gap.

And since nobody asked ... just the opposite occurs with microphones (as they are simply backwards speakers ;) )
 

adjtogo

Well-Known Member
I'm glad there are a few people here that are electrical engineers. Maybe you can put a resume in and work for Bose and tell that all you know and what they did wrong in their design. Or better yet, design your own, buy out Bose, and become a billionaire. Good grief!!! Can't we just appreciate the fact that something new was developed, tested, and is better than the product it replaced?
 

dboomer

Member
Ron ... you should read a little more carefully. My statements were all endorsements for the use of smaller drivers compared to traditional designs.
 

Bob Dietrich

Active Member
I'm glad there are a few people here that are electrical engineers. Maybe you can put a resume in and work for Bose and tell that all you know and what they did wrong in their design. Or better yet, design your own, buy out Bose, and become a billionaire. Good grief!!! Can't we just appreciate the fact that something new was developed, tested, and is better than the product it replaced?
I don't believe I said anything against this product at all sir...please point out where I said anything like that. I simply responded to a post about drivers, nothing was said good nor bad about the Bose product...other than Don said he generally prefers the quickness of smaller drivers...and that would be not a knock, but a positive. Please do feel free to point out where I said they did anything wrong in their design...if not, then tone down the attitude dude!
 

adjtogo

Well-Known Member
I don't believe I said anything against this product at all sir...please point out where I said anything like that. I simply responded to a post about drivers, nothing was said good nor bad about the Bose product...other than Don said he generally prefers the quickness of smaller drivers...and that would be not a knock, but a positive. Please do feel free to point out where I said they did anything wrong in their design...if not, then tone down the attitude dude!
Not saying you did, Bob. But it seems like others, who think they know everything electronics, want to point out their "Electrical Expertise", and quite frankly, they don't know a hill of beans when they see one. That's why I made the statement. Too many times, know-it-alls want to pick apart a product because they think they know how to build a better one. I say, have at it. Build one!! Prove you can put your so-called "expertise" to work. Good grief!!
 

Scott Hanna

Member
First off, I love my L1 Model 2's. Been using them since they came out with 2 b1's, and they've been perfect for me and the events I do, mostly weddings and corporate parties. Loved the model 1's before that, but like the M2's much more.

Just got the new B2's. They are really cool, and yes, now I have more bass options. I suppose it's better to have that option now to simply switch to more bass, but I don't think I'll be using it(+) very often. Maybe if we did schools. But I've always felt 2 B1's per tower sounded perfect to me, so I'm thinking the switch will stay in the neutral position most often. Just my opinion.

I do believe some DJ's use too much bass sometimes. They know that adding bass will improve the sound, so they think adding a lot of bass will improve the sound a lot. Not always the case. There is a right balance there. Kind of like cooking. Cooking 30 minutes at 300 degrees? Let's just do 15 minutes at 600 degrees:)

But hey, I've been wrong before, maybe I'll end up using it alot:)
 
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djlouie atlanta

New Member
First off, I love my L1 Model 2's. Been using them since they came out with 2 b1's, and they've been perfect for me and the events I do, mostly weddings and corporate parties. Loved the model 1's before that, but like the M2's much more.

Just got the new B2's. They are really cool, and yes, now I have more bass options. I suppose it's better to have that option now to simply switch to more bass, but I don't think I'll be using it(+) very often. Maybe if we did schools. But I've always felt 2 B1's per tower sounded perfect to me, so I'm thinking the switch will stay in the neutral position most often. Just my opinion.

I do believe some DJ's use too much bass sometimes. They know that adding bass will improve the sound, so they think adding a lot of bass will improve the sound a lot. Not always the case. There is a right balance there. Kind of like cooking. Cooking 30 minutes at 300 degrees? Let's just do 15 minutes at 600 degrees:)

But hey, I've been wrong before, maybe I'll end up using it alot:)
Scott,

Would you say you like 1 B2 better at Neutral than 2 B1s...or do they sound pretty much the same?
 

Cap

Always At Your Service
Would you say you like 1 B2 better at Neutral than 2 B1s...or do they sound pretty much the same?
Not a chance. Two B1s and one B2 are closely equivalent in the ( - ) mode.
 
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