Lose the puke voice

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djtunes

Checking Reality
This whole thread just reinforces the truth that I REALLY need to remember to bring a vid. camera to capture my performances.
 

djtunes

Checking Reality
I believe that. A couple times I saw myself and I was like aww what a flake. I instantly changed a couple of really obvious things.

It doesn't help that hearing your own voice played back to you sounds weird.

I saw one video of me and just locked myself in my apartment for 2 days. :D
 

jimeppes

New Member
How many people over use the word....

Well....

Well, ladies and gentleman

Well let's get the party started

Well aright then.

Other over used words, anyone?

Literally... I mean Literally over used words, Literally ;)

lil literaity jimmy
 

Mark Evans

Mobile Beat Moderator
Staff member
Ok, all right, I saw I used to say that all the time when I recorded my self a few years back, I now leave the mic off before I say one of those then start the sentance with the mic on. I edited a video for a DJ that was here years ago and 44 times he said, well all right then. He could not believe it.
 

robertbenda

Active Member
We filmed a wedding in January where the DJ said. "Ladies and gentlemen, how about a big round of applause for..." for all 10 of the wedding party members he introduced... then for each of the five people he intro'd for the toasts.
 

bill_smith

MobileBeat Moderator
Staff member
This thread does reinforce the notion that sooner or later, if you use the Mic enough, an undesirable result can occur.

I have always believed in Less is more, and direct is better than complicated or involved. Attention span of the audience is limited to less than a minute really.

Use that meaningful time of seconds to deliver your message effectively and with brevity, good humour, and grace.

Randy Bartlett's 1% series and the emcee series he taped years ago really drove that home for me.

Videotaping is a great way to point out obvious flaws. But, you always have to work within your own strengths, so decide what those are, and play to those, and work on eliminating what you think a weakness is.

Watching some of the big events on TV, like the Oscars, Grammys, Tony's etc dependent on who's hosting can give you a great on the spot education.

Late night comedy too, is the art of brevity in a confined space. Deliver for maximum effectiveness in a very tight time frame. Watch those guys. They are NEVER in a hurry. They wait, and wait, for the right exact time. It is a science, and an art.
And, I've said it before, hate him or love him, or the show itself, but Tom Bergeron of Dancing with the stars is probably the quickest thinking on his feet emcee in the business.

You can always learn something or pick up a a timing tip by watching.

I've always believed that the timing of something is key to success.

What do I mean?

Speaking while an audience is applauding...message lost.

Not speaking clearly enough, or not enough volume to be heard....message lost.

Speaking while something else is going on that is distracting....message lost.

The entire key imhnbo, is to ensure that at the moment of delivery, YOU are the undisputed center of the universe, until you deflect that attention to whomever or whatever is occurring.

When that activity is done, you redirect that attention back to you to guide the audience to the next activity using the above principles.

Set up, execute, repeat.
 

bb

Well-Known Member
Tom B. uses alright way to often and says uncanny things way to often. I feel he is good but not great. Brook is better, more smoother and to the point. Better looking too, by far. Now if you disagree with that? Hmmm. Lol!
 

-bp-

For Position Only
I notice that many DJ's speak too fast and raise the pitch of their voice. People listen to you when you slow down, enunciate and have something to say. The number one mistake I hear is referring to "The Bride and Groom" ALL NIGHT. Everybody in the wedding party has a name. You, as the person paid to represent the bride and groom, should know them and use them. "Pam's sister and Maid of Honor, Liz" is much more engaging than "The bride's sister" or "The Maid of Honor". Puking is usually first of many signs of laziness that turn potentially good entertainers and communicators into DJ-like objects.
 

bb

Well-Known Member
I notice that many DJ's speak too fast and raise the pitch of their voice. People listen to you when you slow down, enunciate and have something to say. The number one mistake I hear is referring to "The Bride and Groom" ALL NIGHT. Everybody in the wedding party has a name. You, as the person paid to represent the bride and groom, should know them and use them. "Pam's sister and Maid of Honor, Liz" is much more engaging than "The bride's sister" or "The Maid of Honor". Puking is usually first of many signs of laziness that turn potentially good entertainers and communicators into DJ-like objects.

Agreed, that's what I do, real names 80% of the night (in addition Iask about nicknames at the meetings, and if okay to use them I find the right time to say it. The families love it!). For example, the cake cutting he gets carried away, normally Ted, now it's Teddy or Mike (nickname the Alligator) now Alligator lets not give the bride a reason to put you in back in your place. The whole family cracks up and gives me thumbs up.
 
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DJSTEVEZ

DJ Emeritus
It doesn't separate the men from the boys, BUT,
it annoys the ever loving $#!+ out of me when a jock, or anyone who fancies themselves a professional, starts every microphone episode with the phrase "All right". Talk about amatuer night microphone skills. When I started in radio it was the first bad habit the station manager broke me of...that's probably why it bothers me so much. Don't get me wrong, I understand WHY people do it, I just expect more from someone who calls himself a pro. -Z-
 
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jimeppes

New Member
I have to watch my accent.... It can get waaaaayyyyyyyy to Southern depending on what crowd I am in front of.

lil gawwwwaaaaawwww-lee jimmy
 

bill_smith

MobileBeat Moderator
Staff member
I don't look for what is actually being said as much as I do how an emcee reacts when it's live. FWIW, IMHO, Tom B is one of the best at doing that on TV today. He is always thinking on his feet, and I love the dry sense of humor, which is a component of my presentation.

Technique and timing is what I look for. Content of what is being said, not so much.
 
There is a time and a place for everything. But that puke voice really doesn't work.

Also, there is such a thing as knowing when to not say anything. If the crowd is already hyped up, you don't need to yell at them to keep them hyped - just play the darn music and get off the mic! It can really be a buzzkill if you have to keep asking them how much fun they are having....

"Reading the crowd" also means paying attention to their reactions. If you have a packed floor, and its obvious that everyone is enjoying themselves, then is there really a need to ask for the 20th time "Is everyone having a great time out there?"
 
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