It Is Getting Tough. This Is Where The Skillz Come Into Play.

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djgulfcoast

Mobile DJ Alabama
It has been awhile since I have stopped by the board, and decided to see what is happening, and to post some food (or music for thought).

You tube is a blessing and a curse. We now have a generation who has a short attention span, and looks for the most obscure music. I am in favor of a personal collection of music, but sometimes it doesn't translate well for a reception.

Let me say if it is the B/G's choice of picking the playlist, so be it. If someone asks who picked the music, I reply with "the B/G did".

I try to casually try to remind them to pick music that they will enjoy and the crowd will too (if you have all ages at the reception). If a B/G mom is there during our initial meeting they will agree.

Millennials seem to be tougher to engage. In some cases, slow dancing is out, and bump and grind is in.

Usually it is the 40 or older couple who steals the show and gets the applause.

This is where experience is in play to engage the Millennial crowd at times.

On the other side of the debate. I've had several wedding where the Bride and Groom has leaned toward music from the 70's, 80's and 90's.

For the most part, I play few titles from the 60's (RESPECT or Brown Eyed Girl are songs that still do well for example). I don't get many requests for anything before 1975 (average).

Do you think is is going to be tough for the next generation of DJ's to engage a wedding reception crowd? Maybe...Maybe not.
 

NickyB

Gear and Equipment Moderator
When you really think about it, the large majority of "kids" are in tune to the music they've heard at home, namely what their parents listened to. I've found this to be true roughly 95% of the time and the millennials I've performed for do think about their parents, relatives and the audience in general and not solely about themselves. There is that 5% that can make it tough but they're in the minority. However, since I've pretty much backed away from doing weddings (except for 2nd and 3rd times around plus beaucoup anniversaries), I have to admit that I'm no longer an authority on the subject.
 

DJSTEVEZ

DJ Emeritus
Obscure requests are nothing new. There's always the 21 year old kid at the wedding reception who asks "Got any Maiden, dude?" When I was DJing Weddings, the Bride was the Boss. The Mobile Beat Top 200 is still what most jocks are going to end up playing most the time anyway at multi-generational events such as Weddings.
-Z-
 

Bill_Goode

Mobile Beat Moderator
Staff member
My stock & trade is weddings...

I see the point, but many of the twenty-something couples that have come to us tend to lean towards mainstream. However, their optics now list oldies along the lines of Sheryl Crow, Sister Hazel, Beastie Boys, Lonestar (Amazed), Mariah Carey (in the Sony days), etc.

Even the "can I connect my phone so you can play this tune?" request is on the wane. If it is obscure, the expectation is that the DJ will just download it on the fly.

The cheese has moved again.
 

DJSTEVEZ

DJ Emeritus
If it is obscure, the expectation is that the DJ will just download it on the fly. The cheese has moved again.
Bill, check your PMs/Conversations :)

Indeed it has. I was talking to someone looking to break into the field who was all enamored with a service where you get access to a million tunes via a monthly subscription, but you never own them, you only have access to stream them. I was like "and what if you have a gig with crappy wifi conditions?"

The technology is changing faster than ever before.
-Z-
 
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djgulfcoast

Mobile DJ Alabama
I guess the point is the couples that I like to call Youtube video hunters but 90% of the wedding guests say "did you pick the music?"

The bottom line... it is the Bride and grooms wedding, and what they like is what I play.
 

NickyB

Gear and Equipment Moderator
I sincerely hope that they read the entire EULA from each download services .... I'm finding that the large majority of millennals could care less about the legality of this particular issue.
 

djgulfcoast

Mobile DJ Alabama
Many of today's music listeners feel they have no obligation to purchase music. From a revenue standpoint the industry is in sad shape. As long as the music is accessible through sources like YouTube, making a purchase is moot. This impacts every industry from radio, to distribution, to the mobile DJ. Pandora and other pure plays will be forced to transition to a subscription service. You might see music disappear for the most part of the free you tube service (they just started a paid service). The business model will need to change. Pandora has been forced to add commercials, and the subscription model is not keeping up with the expenses. I see a service like Iheart, apple or slacker snapping up some players to narrow the field.
 

Calash

Coastal Music Services
I agree with NickyB, who commented on the post I wrote about the 6th grade dance that went south.....Most people could care less about legality issues, and everyone is an expert when your working.."Oh, I can get that on
Spotify right now, don't you have it? How about Pandora or You Tube,its right here..seeeeeeeeeeeee! I have worked with brides where you cant get a word in edgewise. Years ago, I met with this couple who loved Gordon Lightfoot, and I am probably his biggest fan. Anyway, they insisted that I play "The Wreck of the Edmond Fitzgerald" at the reception. I thought to myself that this was not a good decision, but did it anyway. During the song, a guest came up to me and said "why would you play such a depressing song at such a cheerful event"? I replied, "The B & G asked me to. She walked away.
 

Bill_Goode

Mobile Beat Moderator
Staff member
Actually, the industry is in excellent shape. They just want you to believe they are coming apart.

Why, you ask?

They are making some big coin on music licensing. As the cost of distributing music has gone down, they have ramped up their respective music licensing divisions. This is the big revenue driver for Sony Music, WMG, Dreamworks, and other companies with big catalogs.

A lot of the newer bands (and older ones, such as the Eagles) will tell you they don't make much from album and music sales. The bulk of the income comes from touring, songwriting and publishing royalties, and licensing.
 

Ausumm

Active Member
I think this business will get tougher as the years pass.
But but not due to the age of the audience.
The current state of "popular music"...is cut-throat, short lived, and not controlled by actual popularity.
Talent is not required. Very few new artists write their own songs, and most don't play instruments.
It's only about good looks, timing, and creative promotion.
(the accidental release of a sex tape doesn't hurt, either)
As DJ's we tend to laugh about songs like Stairway to Heaven and Freebird.
But I'm pretty sure we've ALL gotten our money's worth when we bought them.
Basically, there are no more "classic" artists, so there are no more "classic" songs.
Future generations will have no "dependable" party songs...like Love Shack, Celebration, etc.
Because it's all disposable, with no shelf life.
 

azdeejay

New Member
I think this business will get tougher as the years pass.
But but not due to the age of the audience.
The current state of "popular music"...is cut-throat, short lived, and not controlled by actual popularity.
Talent is not required. Very few new artists write their own songs, and most don't play instruments.
It's only about good looks, timing, and creative promotion.
(the accidental release of a sex tape doesn't hurt, either)
As DJ's we tend to laugh about songs like Stairway to Heaven and Freebird.
But I'm pretty sure we've ALL gotten our money's worth when we bought them.
Basically, there are no more "classic" artists, so there are no more "classic" songs.
Future generations will have no "dependable" party songs...like Love Shack, Celebration, etc.
Because it's all disposable, with no shelf life.
That pretty much sums up the state of current music.

I was thinking about this a few days, today, there are very few singers that are spanning more than a couple years, there is no more real longevity anymore. I am pretty sure this time next year, we wont remember half of of the current chart toppers.
 

NickyB

Gear and Equipment Moderator
azjeejay - While I agree with much of what you said, there are a few exceptional performers who do record and have musical talents. One who comes to mind, and you may or may not agree, is Lady Gaga who plays piano, writes and records her own material (albeit somewhat repetitive but danceable) , but also performs side by side with great and lasting artists like Tony Bennett. I think she's got the versatility to stick around.

All in all though, I agree with you ..... gone are the days of lasting artists with talent like Elton John, Elvis Presley, Rod Stewart etal.
 

azdeejay

New Member
NickyB, in my hast to make a reply, I ended up throwing a blanket over all the current artists with it, and you are correct, and I agree 100% with what you said. Lagy Gaga is one of the few artists that has some sustainability over the last 6/7 years now?, and there are a few others that are getting few a years, but that is no longer the norm, and really hasn't been for a long time now.

I still like current music , and its what I relate too for the most part and I am still very much in the target demo for it being in my mid 30's.
 

NickyB

Gear and Equipment Moderator
I completely understand and you're spot on! I've been at this DJ biz for nearly 30 yrs and have watched many changes over that span. Prior to that I spent nearly 20 yrs as a part-time musician in a top-40 show band (we worked 50 weekends per year) and all members had full time jobs (mine was computer geek for NASA). As you can guess, I've seen quite a bit of changeover in the entertainment industry.
 

Ausumm

Active Member
One who comes to mind, and you may or may not agree, is Lady Gaga who plays piano, writes and records her own material (albeit somewhat repetitive but danceable) , but also performs side by side with great and lasting artists like Tony Bennett. I think she's got the versatility to stick around.
Yes! There are a few good ones.
Lady Gaga is extremely talented, and has a lot of quality "hits" to her credit.
But in 20 years, will people be requesting a "classic" Lady Gaga song?
 

NickyB

Gear and Equipment Moderator
I guess we'll have to wait 20 yrs and see (hear) ...... I may not make it that far since I'm already 71.
 
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