A Soldier's Modesty

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DJSTEVEZ

DJ Emeritus
I ran into a US Army Soldier in the men's room last night at the gig I was playing (he wasn't at the party I was playing). It wound up we were both washing our hands at the same time. I get choked up whenever I see someone in person dressed in an Armed Forces uniform. They are what comes between me & all I love so dearly in this world AND not having all I love so dearly in this world...at least in my mind.

I waited for him to dry his hands and I said hello and thanked him for his service. By his response I could immediately tell he was uncomfortable with the positive attention. He down played his role for a minute. I countered by indicating that so many would be up the creek without him. He thought about it for a second and apologized (for making light of himself in response to my comment). He then offered me his hand and said that on behalf of himself and so many others, "we thank you for your support". While we shook hands I was hoping I could hold off the emotion of the moment so as to not have tears welling up. I don't remember if it was he or me that immediately followed the moment up with a joke about the women in the hotel, but it was much needed comic relief. The encounter made my night.

To all those who here who have served and/or have family that have serve or are serving, my family I thank you. :usa
 

NickyB

Gear and Equipment Moderator
And you're welcome ...... support was not so great in the USA for my group but I was happy to have served and would do it again.

SSGT Nick Burke USAF ('65-'69) Vietnam Era
ECM Elecronics Repair Technician TAC & SAC
 

bill_smith

MobileBeat Moderator
Staff member
Ditto. I didn't run into the Vietnam issues,(didn't serve during that time)but I do vividly recall seeing a bumper sticker at Keesler AFB in Biloxi MS, that stated: "Help clean up Biloxi, shoot an airman"

I was dressed in blues, and driving right behind him.:(

It's a lot better for all our servicemen and women these days, and I am glad for it.

SSGt Willam D Smith
1978-82, USAF
Computer maintenance repair ATC
 

DJSTEVEZ

DJ Emeritus
support was not so great in the USA for my group but I was happy to have served and would do it again.
Ditto. I didn't run into the Vietnam issues,(didn't serve during that time)but I do vividly recall seeing a bumper sticker at Keesler AFB in Biloxi MS, that stated: "Help clean up Biloxi, shoot an airman" I was dressed in blues, and driving right behind him.:( It's a lot better for all our servicemen and women these days, and I am glad for it.
I remeber hearing about this in history class, but not from when it actually happened (which is not an age crack to those who did experience it/remember it). In my day, during the gulf war, I remember a lot of "Love The Troops, Hate The War" shirts & protest signs...so yes, it is much better.
 
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hankedw

Member
Thank you for posting Steve, and you are welcome. Wish more people felt the way you do. When I came back stateside in 65 we were told to wear civilian clothes and not our uniforms because of the times. It was sad.
 

oldschooldj

Member
I have always felt my father was treated wrong, he did a combat tour in Korea and three combat tours in Vietnam, all as an infantry soldiers (numerous decorations including a Silver Star) and never received any positive recognition for his service from the public, which included 22 years total with the Army.

I, like the person you met have had more pats on the back and offers for dinners and discounts than you can shake a stick at, and I do appreciate all of them!

Ray J.
 

djtunes

Checking Reality
I am like that too Steve.

Seeing a person in uniform was not as common when I lived in Indiana.

Now it's practically an every day occurrence. I'm living about 20 min. away from Patrick Air Force Base, and 30 min. from Kennedy Space Center.

I see a lot of them here usually wearing fatigues, and always give them a big smile, a kind word, and a nod. It's always an honor to hold the door open for a soldier going in or out of a store or the gas station.

I get a few military weddings every year too. I give a discount to military. Some of them are either home on leave, or just about to be sent overseas.

The ones I see around town are usually surrounded by other soldiers on a daily basis right here. It's not the same as the welcome a soldier gets when returning to her or his home town. A lot of locals are so used to seeing them that it's not as big of a deal for them, it still is to me though.

One was standing in the gas station the other day, he went to the men's room and saw that the door was locked and he needed the key from the cashier. Then he went and stood at the back of a line of about 6 other people to wait to ask the cashier for the key. I walked around everyone, spotted the key laying on the check out counter, grabbed it and took it back to him. He told me thanks, and I said, "You shouldn't have to wait in any line around here." It was my good deed for the day. :)
 
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