10 Things I Hate About Being A DJ

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BBBuffalo

Active Member
What are some of the things you dislike the most about your job as a DJ?

I'm not really talking about the person who tells you the music sucks, but more like things pertaining to the business of being a DJ.

Sales presentations, marketing, contracts, forms, time management, taxes and that sort of stuff.
 

MarcTaylor

New Member
I Hate the kids who ask me to turn down the volume and rejoin their group of friends 5 feet away from the speakers!
 

chubbyb

New Member
I can't stand the email shopper- "can you give me your best price for a 4 hour event." - no date, time, or location, no idea what kind of party and even if we handle your type of an event- just email me a price without knowing anything about the event.

Can't stand the bride that shops soley on price- she finds a $400 dj and wants the better $300 dj- couldn't care less about anything but what's the price... but will complain non-stop after the event about how bad it was

clients shopping "on a budget" but won't share with you what the budget is... tell me and I'll see if I can work with you or refer you to someone who might be able to work at your budget

the client having the 5 hour event, but only want to pay for you for three hours and wants you to arrive, load in, set-up, sound check etc. while dinner and everything else is taking place in the same space/area... had that exact scene this week and refused the gig... lady could not understand how big of a distraction it will be when someone shows up at her event in t-shirt and shorts in the middle of summer during her dinner/awards portion and proceeds to become a huge distraction... of course the guests will assume he is late and probably never contact him no matter how good a job he does... facility might assume the same thing


can't you arrive 4 hours early, set-up and leave your gear and come back later when we really need you... yeah that'll happen

one of my favorites,"we're a non-profit." we'll I'm a FOR PROFIT, it's how I support my family ... and non-profits waste 60% of donations at least to cover thier jobs and expenses... because you're a non-profit means I need to take a pay cut?

"How much, the jobs ONLY 4 hours!" really , so I magically telelport in, my gear has arrived, I've got a timeline, music, annoucement form everything I need to succeed all waiting for me- wow!
 

chubbyb

New Member
as I'm standing behind my set-up, in professional attire, looking busy "are you the DJ?"

no, I'm the bartender, the dj thought it'd be neat if we switched jobs for the night.
 

Hutt

Pro Dj groupie since 1996
"Can you guys play a song?".....it's only me standing there..

Do you have this song?...No.... Are you sure?......:)
 
* School Faculty who allow students to call DJs to get "a price"

* Lack of respect amongst other wedding vendors

* Chat Board know-it-alls (who don't really know-it-all) :)

* Facility Managers who give ZERO consideration as to "where" the entertainment should be logistically placed in the banquet room!

* Dealing with so-called Wedding Coordinators who couldn't coordinate a toddler's birthday party at Chuckie Cheese!

* People who say "oh you're a DJ . . . what do you really want to do?" ( . . you mean when I grow up?)

* Cheap DJs who won't spend a dime on advanced level education and training (because they think chat boards are the Holy Grail to progress as a business person! Yeah, whatever!!!)

* Photographers who approach their craft as being the one and only important service provided at a wedding - giving NO consideration to the timeline and timely execution of responsibilities of other vendors who need to perform their job.

* Customers or guests who come up and say "yeah, I DJ too!" You do? Really?

* School Districts who already have in place a policy for Independent Contractors to be Licensed (with the city) and Insured (Liability & Workers Comp) - but don't follow these mandates for DJs who have direct contact with their students. So sad we have to "educate the educators!"
 

Ken Heath

Super Moderator...da-ta-daaa!!!
Staff member
I've given this serious thought and I've come to the conclusion that there's not one thing about being a dj that I hate.

There's thousands of things I hate about being a grown-up, a business owner, about having to deal with the public, and having responsibilities... but not one thing about the actual conduct of being a dj that irks me!

:rolleyes:
 

GaryBonaducci

New Member
10 THINGS I HATE ABOUT BEING A DJ

1) Not being able to find my shoes Sunday morning after having slept with the young lady who wanted to "thank" me for playing all those songs for her and her girlfriends.

2) Being slightly intimidated and afraid if a customer may belong to the mob after he slips me a $20 along with his song request.

3) That weird feeling that someone is checking out my backside as I'm bending over and flipping through my CD collection.

4) Not being able to smoke on the job anymore after all those pansies in my county voted to outlaw smoking in public places.

5) Ditto that for not being able to fog up the room anymore.

6) Ditto that even one more time for not being able to have an ice cold beer in the DJ booth anymore.

7) 10:00PM underage drinking raids by the Liquor Commission Board. They should at least wait til past 1:00AM, after I had my fun for most of the evening.

8) Clients and bar managers who insist on paying by check when I specifically ask for cash.

9) Hearing loss.

AND FINALLY....

10) Needing to wake up on Monday mornings to go to the Real Job that actually pays the bills!
 

Daniel David

New Member
one of my favorites,"we're a non-profit." we'll I'm a FOR PROFIT, it's how I support my family ... and non-profits waste 60% of donations at least to cover thier jobs and expenses... because you're a non-profit means I need to take a pay cut?
Actually there are ways to make yourself smell like a rose, promotoe your business, and still get paid with a non profit.

Educate the client and they will pay your full rate only if they understand the up front costs going into their event and how the IRS views our services.

I did a non profit function last year and got my full rate of $1200. I made a donation to their organization, and got to reap the benefits of writing it off on my taxes.

You have to be willing to invest a little time into your business to educate not only yourself, but the potential client whom may only hire a DJ once or twice in their lifetime.

If you do not see the opportunity in the exposure for your business performing for non profit events you are really missing out.

Also if you do not want to perform for non profits pass them my way and I'll buy you a drink with the profits.
 

bobbyd

Member
Danie;
If you make 1200 and give away 1200 where is the profit?
If there is a profit why not charge 2400 and give back 2400 to double the profit? Please explain th logic.
 

adjtogo

Well-Known Member
I'd rather think of the thousands of things I love about being a DJ, than thinking of things I hate. Time flies when you're having fun. I've been in this business for over 17 years. If I thought about the negative things, it might become too much like work and I might begin hating it. So, I'm taking the high road and focusing on the positives, the things that keep me going, the things that motivate me, the joy of performing, enthusiasm, motivation, meeting people, performing in front of live people, the happiness it brings to a bride's day, and the satisfaction knowing I did my best with the ability God gave me to perform.

For any business to succeed, one must focus on the positives, not the negatives.
 

Daniel David

New Member
Danie;
If you make 1200 and give away 1200 where is the profit?
If there is a profit why not charge 2400 and give back 2400 to double the profit? Please explain th logic.
Who said I gave them back $1200? I said I made a donation to them never said how much.

It's pretty easy to make something off of the performance.

The IRS sees DJ services as a donation of time, and therefore nothing can be deducted for your time, thats the dontated part to the client.

Non profits have funds to put on charity events. Most of these contributions are tax deductable. However depending how they are setup as a non profit, you may have to write off the show as a business expense.

You can charge for the use of the equipment which becomes equipment rental revenue.

I have pretty much given away most of the information, but you have to educate yourself on the rest.
 

Scotty

Active Member
What are some of the things you dislike the most about your job as a DJ?

I'm not really talking about the person who tells you the music sucks, but more like things pertaining to the business of being a DJ.

Sales presentations, marketing, contracts, forms, time management, taxes and that sort of stuff.

Looking forward to your answers....
 

djgulfcoast

Mobile DJ Alabama
Rate integrity is the key. I turn down several $300.00 weddings each year and I have no issue with that. I know several prospective clients where price has been the only factor. We move on, promote our service. Life is good. Promote yourself, and good things will follow.
 

BBBuffalo

Active Member
Looking forward to your answers....
I used the word "hate" in the description just to play off the movie title.

Here are things I dislike.
Having to educate the majority of the people that call or send an email asking "how much".

While I enjoy going to network events, I dislike all the schmoozing required before some other vendors will give you the time of day.

I think the thing I dislike the most is the reputation DJs have given themselves, and the shortsitedness of the majority.

Dealing with all the disparate systems required to meet customer needs. (it'd be great to have everything in 1 tidy little program)

I really dislike how the wedding industry also has a bad opinion of many DJs (again probably self inflicted)
 

Daniel David

New Member
I used the word "hate" in the description just to play off the movie title.

Here are things I dislike.
Having to educate the majority of the people that call or send an email asking "how much".

While I enjoy going to network events, I dislike all the schmoozing required before some other vendors will give you the time of day.

I think the thing I dislike the most is the reputation DJs have given themselves, and the shortsitedness of the majority.

Dealing with all the disparate systems required to meet customer needs. (it'd be great to have everything in 1 tidy little program)

I really dislike how the wedding industry also has a bad opinion of many DJs (again probably self inflicted)
Neal I agree with you.

If DJ's invested a little time to make themselves better, and charged a professional rate for their services, customers would not be asking how much all of the time.

Unfortunately the majority of the DJ industry has the gas station mentality as alluded to in Mark Ferrell's getting what you're worth CD series.

The majority of DJs are so desperate to make a sale they will cut their prices, or allow themselves to be contracted out, thus becoming a DJ whore.

If that rubs someone the wrong way I am sorry, but sometimes the truth hurts.
 

Daniel David

New Member
The sad thing is there are highly respected DJs who are in this industry that were in the exact same position as most of you are now. (myself included)

However, when they share their information people accuse them of making the stuff up, or they have a hidden agenda, (or whatever else you would like to add here).

Stop listening to the people that are telling you that you aren't worth a priemum price and start listening to the ones that tell you YOU ARE WORTH A LOT MORE THAN WHAT YOU ARE CURRENTLY CHARGING.
 

bill_smith

MobileBeat Moderator
Staff member
I hate the fact that one day I will become too old to physically have this much fun. I like the fact that the Smiths in my generation dont have to look forward to that til 80 or so.
 
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