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We just don't want to pay more than $700. Our friends and family are easy to please.

Discussion in 'Business, Marketing, Websites' started by Sir Charles, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. Sir Charles

    Sir Charles New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
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    Yes, that's what she said. This is after we met so I obviously didn't do a good enough job conveying the value of my services for her reception (gotta work on that:) ). Though they said they liked what I had to share at our meeting. In other words, if I could do it for $700, I'm in. My basic package starts at $850. I feel like I'd be cheapening things for me and them.

    Where they're having it is certainly not cheap. It's being held at a country club. Prices for entrees $32-$36/person on average, open bar for four hours $25-27/person. I forget how many guests, but I think either 150-200. Oh, and they're having A Frank Sinatra singer there for dinner. Talk about low balling me. I even offered to give them a package upgrade earlier this week form my low price of $850 to the next level up. OH and 'Frank would get about $200 for his hour of work, and all he needs to bring is his iphone to plug into my system!

    Before I reply back, there are many of you on this board who are much more skilled at this than me. But here's what I have written...

    "I understand your concern . But there’s a lot more to a wedding reception than having an easy to please crowd and for such a low amount, I would not be able to give you my best. Since I only work with clients who want me to do my best work, I have to respectfully decline. I’m sure there are many up and coming DJs who would love to do it for that amount.

    This is a full-time job for me, not a part-time hobby. Out of the money I earn has to come all my expenses including...equipment upkeep or replacement, music subscription, advertising, van payments plus the insurance for it, (not to mention repairs, ugggh!), professional training (yes, there is professional training for DJs, it’s where I learn from the top DJs in the country), my mortgage, home repairs, utilities, vacation, ‘and it goes on and on and on’ (to quote Taio Cruz!). It’s a lot more than you think.

    Think about your jobs...What would ING tell me if I said I wanted a higher interest on my savings account? Would you be willing to take a pay cut so that I could have it? Of course not! And I wouldn’t expect you to either. You are a professional at what you do and deserve to be paid what you are paid, if not more.

    A DJ can ruin your wedding just as easily as he can make it the most memorable day of your lives. I’m sorry you don’t see the value in what a professional DJ can do for your reception.

    I sent you a different wedding video along with some information on choosing the right DJ. I sincerely wish you both the best of luck and I thank you for taking the time to meet with me and picking up my tab when I wasn’t paying attention (Anthony!).

    Should you change your mind after meeting with other DJs (and I encourage you to do so), I'd be happy to speak with you again, should you change your mind, but keep in mind I can no longer honor my offer of a package upgrade. Two brides that I met with this past week booked my Platinum Package without any upgrades"

    After writing this, I also realized that I don't want to give them an upgrade because they can definitely afford my services, but I don't think they'd appreciate it. I booked two weddings today at over $1100 so I can command that amount (should I tell them that?

    Any feedback, constructive critiquing, would be appreciated!

    Chuck

    What would you add
  2. MBM

    MBM New Member

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    1,079
    I would hold to my guns and maybe even mention the two bookings you just made. How long until their reception?
  3. Sir Charles

    Sir Charles New Member

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    Not til next March 23rd, so a whole year. I don't plan on accepting the work. I think they'l come around. If they don't, their loss. This is easily a $20G wedding. It's unusual for a bridal couple to be thinking so cheap considering what they are looking for. I've been giving a money saving report to them ahead of time, but now I think I'll pull it out when they say my prices are too high!
  4. robertbenda

    robertbenda Active Member

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    Shorten your response by a lot. Keep it simple and to the point (no aside references to Taio Cruz). And a cheaper prices wouldn't keep you from doing your best; I'm sure you always give every client your best. Also, it's not your fault, so good for you for not aplogozing in your email - and for avoiding the angry tone.

    'Easy to please or not, my low prices are the minimum I need to earn to cover my expenses. I'm simply unable to drop down any further.

    Being a successful DJ isn't just about music: it requires good listening and public speaking skills. Someone who is likable, organized, and experienced. Someone you trust to represent you in front of all your friends and family. If, after meeting with me, you feel I am that person you can trust than I hope to hear from you. If not, I hope you do find the right DJ for you.'
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2012
  5. Bill_Goode

    Bill_Goode Mobile Beat Moderator Staff Member

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    You need to turn it around to them and remove all references to "I". Do not talk about what you need, what your expenses are, what you can do, but maybe something like this:

    " Thanks for your consideration. It sounds like you have a fantastic crowd and the wedding will be very top-notch with your choice of vendors.

    The fee quoted is the lowest possible to make sure your choice of entertainment is the best possible while holding the lines on cost. It includes the personal planning that will go into your day along with (how what you do plays into their idea of making the event a success), allowing the Sinatra singer to utilize the sound system (something that normally is extra because of the audio engineering requirements of what will be a live performance), plus the fun, elegance and peace-of-mind (XYZ DJ Company) brings to the event.

    It would be great to work with you! Please let us know what your preference is."

    Remember, the focus is always on the client and how what you do plays into what they envision (their needs). Never make it about your needs or you will lose every time.
  6. That Music Guy

    That Music Guy New Member

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    If you can't do it for $700.00, walk away; don't waste your time. They aren't your client....To me, your reply sounds a bit desperate.....
  7. bill_smith

    bill_smith Mobile beat Moderator Staff Member

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    I like Bill's response, I'm going to use it as the basis for mine." Thanks for your consideration. It sounds like you have a fantastic crowd and the wedding will be very top-notch with your choice of vendors.The fee quoted is the best that is possible given what you need. It includes the personal planning that will go into your day , allowing the Dinner hour singer to utilize the sound system and the expertise of the sound system operator to support a live performance, plus the fun, elegance and peace-of-mind (XYZ DJ Company) brings to the event.It would be great to work with you! Please let us know what your preference is."
  8. hippydog

    hippydog wuz here when it was Red.

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    #1: a high budget does not mean the couple has a high priority on entertainment.. You first need to step back and acknowledge that maybe you did everything right, and that they simply dont care..
  9. Maverick

    Maverick Pumping It Up

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    If you can't do it for $700.00, walk away; don't waste your time. They aren't your client....To me, your reply sounds a bit desperate.....

    Agreed....whats the point of this? Are you trying to justify lowering your price? We get people like this all the time, this is one reason we ask them before we meet whats your budget, and do some recon on them..if they don't have one or tell us 600.00 we dont mess with them and just send them pricing...is your pricing on your website?
  10. Sir Charles

    Sir Charles New Member

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    Thanks for the feedback, Gents.

    They knew my prices before we met so I'm not sure what they were expecting. Regarding sounding desperate, maybe my wording needs to change, but I don't think you should give up that quickly without at least making a final case and leaving the door open to a possible reunion :). That's the whole reason I posted here before sending it, so I came across in the best possible light, this way I can still ask them for references.


    Hippydog, you may be right, they may not care, but it may also be that they do care but they're unaware of how important the DJ is. I'm not necessarily trying to overtly convince them, but at least on a covert level in case they were looking for a deal.

    Robert and Bill, thanks for your suggestions on the wording.
  11. bill_smith

    bill_smith Mobile beat Moderator Staff Member

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    the point being made is that you spent too much time justifying why you charge in the proposed response and defending it.

    They don't care what your side of the story is...truly. If they did care, they wouldn't have asked you to chop the rate. For them, it's a number. And they have a number in mind. Part of selling is the ability to let it go without caring personally about the loss, which is a very hard thing to do.

    Do you believe that every client cared about notifying you that they chose someone else?

    No.

    I'll bet that they often simply stopped responding, no matter what you did. And that sucks. You never find out what it was. For every sale you do not get, you appear to have plenty you are getting at a price you can live with.

    It sounds to me like you did a good job of presenting the service.

    I had a conversation just two days ago with a client. He wants a ceremony and reception, needs lav support, and wants me to mix live vocals and a band at the reception...and wire up an Ipod.

    So I told him what it would cost. And I explained the shortfalls of mixing off an Ipod, and insisted on a playlist, so that I would have copies of all his music and graphically demonstrated what that could sound like with no backup or alternative play sources....in laymen terms he could understand.

    "I'm trying to keep the cost down, so I think I'll call some other folks."

    "I think you should, but make sure you are comparing apples to apples, and don't just shop on price.

    With me You are getting a sound man with 30 yrs of experience with live bands, karaoke, djing, and everything in between. Make sure that anyone else you talk to can provide exactly what I've explained that you need, and that they can do everything I can at LESS the price I quoted. IF they can, fine, but I don't think so.

    If you do not get quick confident answers, you do not have the right company. Call me back either way please, as I do have a second client who wants this date. First one to give me a check gets it."

    ( Iwant the date, but I'm not going to give it away)

    So he called yesterday wanting to meet up, and apparently didn't even get a call returned. This certainly isn't a blue print, but it is an honest conversation with him about what he didn't know he needed. So I armed him with tools and information in advance of his other calls.

    I'm meeting him Saturday morning:)

    The Date? April 7th. Yep, two weeks from now.

    I alos explained to him that I can make that reception and ceremony look like it was planned for a year...which is true.

  12. djfatman

    djfatman Marketing Moderator

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    "Our family and friends are so easy to please. You'll have an easy time, so you shouldn't have to work so hard. Therefore, you shouldn't charge as much."

    "Well, Mr. Prospect, in that case, I'll only charge you $500. After all, isn't that how a plumber or a mason or a photographer charge? I'm so glad you told me that your group is so easy to please. Sure wouldn't want to charge you too much."

    (Of course, I was being sarcastic)
  13. UNDJ

    UNDJ New Member

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    I get a good chuckle when prospects try to pull this. “Our friends and family are easy to please”.

    Or, this one…
    “It’s going to be a very small, simple event. We’re not doing any formalities except a First Dance so it’ll be a real easy gig for you.”

    Heck, I feel like I have to work harder to fill the floor when there are less formalities or a smaller number of guests.

    I thought what you wrote was spot-on. To me, prospects pulling the “Can you do it for less?” is a slap in the face. I used to give in to that type of stuff, and most of the time the client ended up being a PITA anyway. I learned the hard way. Like others have said, stick to your guns.

    However, the prospect could give a hoot less about your expenses, so I’d condense that.

    Bill Goode, your post was gold. Thank you for that.

    Amen hippy. I recently had a Bride book a $15,000 venue and a $4,000 photographer. After trying to nickel and dime me (which I would have none of) she ended up hiring a $350 DJ. I wish I could be a fly on the wall at that reception.

    As for their expectations after hearing your price up-front, the Groom probably said “Eh, he’s just a DJ. I can talk him down.” When a couple tries to nickel and dime me, 90% of the time it’s the Groom doing it. I give my pricing up front too, but prospects will still try to “negotiate” sometimes.

    Bill Smith, your post was great too.
  14. -bp-

    -bp- For Position Only

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    Okay, so don't spend more than $700. I'm not twisting your arm.

    Wait, yes I am. Sorry. I'll let go now.
  15. Bobby D

    Bobby D New Member

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    I hope you're getting some better ideas on how to respond in this thread. Your response was very long and didn't do anything to make the sale or secure a possible referral. Yes, with a friendly response she might still recommend you to one of her friends in the future. Don't give the prospect any reason to bad mouth you. Talking about how in demand your are is good if done right. Mentioning a DJ can ruin a wedding should be done tactfully if at all.

    Since you've declined, is there really anything more to talk about?

    Prospects don't care about your expenses. It sounds like you were just unloading your feelings on the prospect. In fact, it sounds a bit like whining. Your mortgage etc. has nothing to do with your DJ business. Everyone has living expenses. Bringing up that you've had training could be a selling point, but not if listing it as an expense. Same with music subscription.
  16. bill_smith

    bill_smith Mobile beat Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanx. I am booked for april 7:)

    Stick to the guns.
  17. UNDJ

    UNDJ New Member

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    Agreed (as I stated above). It's like when prospects whine to us about how poor they are, what a small budget they're on, etc. In my head, I'm thinking "I don't give a hoot. You're either going to pay me $XXX or you can find another DJ." Simple enough. Thus, that means we can't turn that around on them either and pull the expenses bit.

    If someone asks for a cheaper price via e-mail, I say "I believe my price is very fair considering the amount of time, personal attention, and professionism I give to my clients and their event. In fact, after their weddings, most of my clients tell me I was worth more than they paid for. I'd be more than happy to provide you with testimonials from some of my recent clients, including some from (their venue, if I have any).

    90% of the time, this does the trick. I've learned (again, the hard way), that many propsects will ask you to lower your price just to see if you'll do it or not, and would pay your regular price anyway. Stick to your guns and if they still say no, they probably weren't worth your time and efforts anyway. Let them walk and move onto the next one!
  18. akela

    akela New Member

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    I would stick to my guns. I would just tell them that I am quoting a very fair price and they are welcome to look for another DJ who would cater to their budget.

    "Our family and friends are easy to please" Whatta joke.


  19. fbeweds

    fbeweds New Member

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    don't back down

    I would of slide down to a lower package or cut the time frame of package.

    Or said this (Ms. Client, I do understand that most couples are paying for their own wedding more now, and if you can only afford $700 dollars i would be glad to offer that as a simple basic package no extras. You are still welcome to shop around and I will hold the date for one week. Best Wishes)

    Some money is better than no money.
  20. djmbr01

    djmbr01 Account Closed

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    The anthem of those that have nothing more valuable to do.

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